Freddie Hubbard Hub-tones



Frederick Dewayne "Freddie" Hubbard (April 7, 1938 – December 29, 2008)[1] was an American jazz trumpeter. He was known primarily for playing in the bebop, hard bop and post bop styles from the early 1960s and on. His unmistakable and influential tone contributed to new perspectives for modern jazz and bebop.[2] In the 1980s Hubbard was again leading his own jazz group - this time with Billy Childs and Larry Klein, among others, as members - attracting favorable reviews, playing at concerts and festivals in the USA and Europe, often in the company of Joe Henderson, playing a repertory of hard-bop and modal-jazz pieces. Hubbard played at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1980 and in 1989 (withBobby Hutcherson). He played with Woody Shaw, recording with him in 1985, and two years later recorded Stardust with Benny Golson. In 1988 he teamed up once more with Blakey at an engagement in Holland, from which came Feel the Wind. In 1988, Hubbard played with Elton John, contributing trumpet and flugelhorn and trumpet solos on the track "Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters (Part Two)" for John's Reg Strikes Back album. In 1990 he appeared in Japan headlining an American-Japanese concert package which also featured Elvin Jones, Sonny Fortune, pianists George Duke andBenny Green, bass players Ron Carter, and Rufus Reid, with jazz and vocalist Salena Jones. He also performed at the Warsaw Jazz Festival at whichLive at the Warsaw Jazz Festival (Jazzmen 1992) was recorded.[2] Following a long setback of health problems and a serious lip injury in 1992 where he ruptured his upper lip and subsequently developed an infection, Hubbard was again playing and recording occasionally, even if not at the high level that he set for himself during his earlier career.[11] His best records ranked with the finest in his field. In 2006, The National Endowment for the Arts honored Hubbard with its highest honor in jazz, the NEA Jazz Masters Award. On December 29, 2008, Hubbard's hometown newspaper, The Indianapolis Star, reported that Hubbard had died from complications from a heart attack suffered on November 26.[13] Billboardmagazine reported that Hubbard died in Sherman Oaks, California.[14] Freddie Hubbard had close ties to the Jazz Foundation of America in his later years. Freddie is quoted as saying, “When I had congestive heart failure and couldn't work, The Jazz Foundation paid my mortgage for several months and saved my home! Thank God for those people."[15] The Jazz Foundation of America’s Musicians' Emergency Fund took care of him during times of illness. After his death, Hubbard’s estate requested that tax-deductible donations be made in his name to the Jazz Foundation of America.[16]



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Brenda Mtambo

Brenda Mtambo
99,99 ZAR each

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''Singer Brenda Mtambo (30) has done backing vocals for a host of South African musical stars. In fact, she has sung with just about every artist worth ­mentioning: Hugh Masekela, ­Sibongile Khumalo, Judith Sephuma, Lira, Thandiswa Mazwai, Jonas Gwangwa — the list rolls on.

She was an integral part of the hugely successful Joyous ­Celebration gospel ensemble and, as a travelling singer, she got to see large chunks of the world.

Now it is time for Mtambo to claim her space. Her first album is called Inspired and is released by Joyous Records. She launched the album in Sandton on Thursday night.

The surprise is that this gospel label has released a purely Afro-soul jazz title without a ­religious message.

Mtambo was born in Umlazi, ­outside Durban, where she was schooled, later attending the then University of Durban-Westville to study for a BCom in accounting.

She came to ­Johannesburg to finish her studies and, once there, joined Joyous ­Celebration — a move that put an end to her office life''.

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