Malis Davis Filles de Killimanjaro

Miles Davis Filles De Killimanjaro
189,99 ZAR each

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Miles Dewey Davis III  (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, trumpeter, bandleader, and composer. Widely considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century,[3] Miles Davis was, with his musical groups, at the forefront of several major developments in jazz music, including bebop, cool jazz, hard bop, modal jazz, and jazz fusion.

Miles Davis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006.[4] Davis was noted as "one of the key figures in the history of jazz".[4] On October 7, 2008, his 1959 album Kind of Blue received its fourth platinum certification from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), for shipments of at least four million copies in the United States.[5] On December 15, 2009, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a symbolic resolution recognizing and commemorating the album Kind of Blue on its 50th anniversary, "honoring the masterpiece and reaffirming jazz as a national treasure".[6]

Miles Davis is regarded as one of the most innovative, influential and respected figures in the history of music. He has been described as “one of the great innovators in jazz”.[62] The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll noted "Miles Davis played a crucial and inevitably controversial role in every major development in jazz since the mid-'40s, and no other jazz musician has had so profound an effect on rock. Miles Davis was the most widely recognized jazz musician of his era, an outspoken social critic and an arbiter of style—in attitude and fashion—as well as music".[63] His album Kind of Blue is the best-selling album in the history of jazz music. On November 5, 2009, Rep. John Conyers of Michigan sponsored a measure in the United States House of Representativesto recognize and commemorate the album on its 50th anniversary. The measure also affirms jazz as a national treasure and "encourages the United States government to preserve and advance the art form of jazz music."[64] It passed, unanimously, with a vote of 409–0 on December 15, 2009.[65]

As an innovative bandleader and composer, Miles Davis has influenced many notable musicians and bands from diverse genres. Many well-known musicians rose to prominence as members of Davis's ensembles, including saxophonists Gerry MulliganJohn ColtraneCannonball AdderleyGeorge ColemanWayne ShorterDave LiebmanBranford Marsalis and Kenny Garrett; trombonist J. J. Johnson; pianists Horace SilverRed GarlandWynton KellyBill EvansHerbie HancockJoe ZawinulChick CoreaKeith Jarrett and Kei Akagi; guitarists John McLaughlinPete CoseyJohn Scofield and Mike Stern; bassists Paul ChambersRon CarterDave HollandMarcus Miller and Darryl Jones; and drummers Elvin JonesPhilly Joe JonesJimmy CobbTony WilliamsBilly Cobham,Jack DeJohnette, and Al Foster.[citation needed] Miles' influence on the people who played with him has been described by music writer and author Christopher Smith as follows:

Miles Davis' artistic interest was in the creation and manipulation of ritual space, in which gestures could be endowed with symbolic power sufficient to form a functional communicative, and hence musical, vocabulary. [...] Miles' performance tradition emphasized orality and the transmission of information and artistic insight from individual to individual. His position in that tradition, and his personality, talents, and artistic interests, impelled him to pursue a uniquely individual solution to the problems and the experiential possibilities of improvised performance.

His approach, owing largely to the African American performance tradition that focused on individual expression, emphatic interaction, and creative response to shifting contents, had a profound impact on generations of jazz musicians.[66]

In 1986, the New England Conservatory awarded Miles Davis an Honorary Doctorate for his extraordinary contributions to music.[67] Since 1960 the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS) has honored him with eight Grammy Awards, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and three Grammy Hall of Fame Awards. In 2010, Moldejazz premiered a play calledDriving Miles, which focused on a landmark concert Davis performed in Molde, Norway, in 1984.